Raison De’etre: Uncovering Your Reason for Being

Raison De’etre: Uncovering Your Reason for Being

Millions of people trudge off to work each and every day, wishing they were anywhere else, and hoping one day to find what really inspires them. If that’s you, then rest assured, you are not alone.

But know this, too: There is still time to discover your passion and start doing the work you love.

Let’s start with a little brainstorming.

Set aside an hour or so of uninterrupted time. Head out to the park or a coffee shop, and take along your favorite notebook and pens. Find a quiet corner, and just let your mind wander. Do a little introspection, soul-searching and meditating.

Imagine that money is not a concern. You have enough to manage your day-to-day needs, with some left over for fun. You have the freedom to do anything you like with your days.

In your notebook, make a list of all the things you would do with your time if you could spend it any way you liked.

Would you shop?

Would you paint glorious watercolors?

Would you go back to college and earn a degree in computer science?

Travel the world?

Rescue animals?

Work with abused women?

Plant a garden?

If you get stuck, think about what you do on weekends and holidays. Nearly everyone looks forward to relaxing and enjoying their favorite activities after the workweek is done. What are the activities you most enjoy?

The purpose of this exercise is not to make a realistic list of business opportunities, but rather to make a list of possibilities, so don’t censor yourself. Write down whatever pops into your mind without considering if you can make money with it, whether or not you’ll love it forever, or even if you have the skills or talent for it.

That is, after all, what brainstorming is all about. Unfiltered ideas. 

Maybe you already do this, but I want to challenge you for the next 30 days to keep a daily, purposeful journal. Here’s how that works.

First, set aside time each day for journaling. This can be first thing in the morning (great for planning), last thing before you go to bed (perfect for gratitude), or even right after lunch. It doesn’t matter so much what time, but that you make an unbreakable appointment with yourself, and that you commit to doing the work—even when it feels hard or uncomfortable.

Next, rather than just random thoughts and events, try answering specific questions each day. This type of journaling helps you maintain focus, and will allow you to look back later and know exactly what works, what doesn’t, and where you might want to focus your energy.

Some questions to ask each day include:

  1. What was the best thing that happened to me today?
  2. How did I make someone else’s day better?
  3. How could today have been better?
  4. What’s the one big thing I want to get done today?
  5. What’s one thing I did today just for me?
  6. Who made me smile today?
  7. What has been my biggest achievement this week?
  8. Fast forward to next year. What has changed about your life or your business?

You don’t have to answer each and every question every day, and there may be others you’d like to add to your list. Have fun with it, and use your journal as a source of inspiration and reflection. Look forward to what you hope to achieve and reflect on how far you’ve come. Taking note of recurring themes in your journal is a powerful way to discover your true passion in life. Your Raison De’etre…your reason for being. Write to the show or share below and tell us what you uncovered.

Taking note of recurring themes in your journal is a powerful way to discover your true passion in life. Your Raison De’etre…your reason for being. Write to the show or share below and tell us what you uncovered.

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